Lit, Period #8: The Anglo-Saxons

BiblioFiles.jpg

Hwat! The BiblioFiles crew is bringing Lit, Period back in true book-nerd fashion with a conversation about the Anglo-Saxon period. Mead halls, man prices, and revenge are the fare of the day as we tackle this strange, far-away ancestor to the English literary tradition. With about only 30,000 lines of extant material to discuss, this shouldn’t be too difficult!

To grab a copy of the Lit, Period notes for this episode, visit our website at wwww.centerforlit.com/litperiod8.

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

Lit, Period #7: Modernism

BiblioFiles.jpg

Fitzgerald, Hemingway, World War I, and the fragmentation of reality – it can all only mean one thing: Lit, Period is finally back with a discussion of Modernism! The merits of this literary period can be controversial in some circles. Why should we read those expatriates with their stream-of-consciousness narration and difficult texts? The CenterForLit crew sits down to discuss this question and offer their perspective on the American Alcoholics (and friends).

To grab a copy of the Lit, Period notes for this episode, visit our website at wwww.centerforlit.com/litperiod7.

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

Lit, Period #6: Naturalism

BiblioFiles.jpg

Lit, Period is back! And this time the team is diving deeper into a sub-category within American Realism: Naturalism. We discuss famous Naturalist hits like Red Badge of Courage and Jack London, and also spend time throwing around ideas about why anyone would want to read or study these often more depressing works in the first place.

To grab a copy of our Lit, Period notes for this episode visit: www.centerforlit.com/litperiod6

 

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

 

Lit, Period #5: American Realism

BiblioFiles.jpg

We're back with another round of Lit, Period! This time things are getting real. In fact, we're tackling American Realism, that 19th century movement which reacted (pretty strongly) to the nemesis it loved to hate: Romanticism. Now Mark Twain is up to bat...and anything could happen. 

To access the Lit, Period notes we prepared specially for you, visit:

www.centerforlit.com/litperiod5 

 

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

Lit, Period #4: Transcendentalism

BiblioFiles.jpg

In this installment of Lit, Period the CenterForLit team takes a closer look at that particularly American strain of Romanticism: Transcendentalism. Revisiting some of the old friends we introduced in our last episode, we look deeper into what set this romantic philosophy apart from its European cousin and discuss how the movement influences the country even to this day. To follow along with us, download our free printable guide at the link below:

www.centerforlit.com/litperiod4

 

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation. 

Lit, Period #3: The Romantics

BiblioFiles.jpg

We're back with another episode of Lit, Period tackling one of the most wide spread and influential movements in artistic history: the Romantic Era. Much more than ooey gooey feelings, hearts, and rainbows, Romanticism and Transcendentalism shifted intellectual life in a major way that still affects us today. We rapid fire our way through the 5 "W" questions for this literary period, and you can follow along by downloading our nifty guide at the link below:

www.centerforlit.com/litperiod3

Today's episode is sponsored by The Commons, a podcast that chronicles the lives and times of people worth imitating from our friends over at the CiRCE Institute. Join them for season 2, airing now, where host Brian Phillips and his guests lead the way through major church figures and movements in history from the early church through the Great Awakening.

 

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation. 

Lit, Period #2: The Augustan Age

BiblioFiles.jpg

We're back with another look into the movements and ideas that shaped Western literature! Today we're covering the Augustan Age. Never heard of the Augustan Age? Not to fear, Lit Period is here! Enjoy this bite size glance into Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift's Neoclassical Age of Reason and be sure to download your free guide that covers the 5 "W" questions for this era of English literature:

www.centerforlit.com/litperiod2

 

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation. 

Lit, Period #1: Metaphysical Poets

BiblioFiles.jpg

We're rolling out a new BiblioFiles series today: Lit, Period. It's a quick and easy guide through the major literary movements of Western literature, from the 6th century to the 21st. Don't worry, the normal BiblioFiles format isn't going anywhere, but every once and a while we'll be throwing in a Lit, Period episode just to make things exciting. 

Today we're starting with a CenterForLit favorite: the metaphysical poets. And if you feel overwhelmed by the onslaught of information, don't fear! We've put together a free guide for you, which you can download on our website by following the link below:

www.centerforlit.com/litperiod1

We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.