Incredibles 2: Grace for the Technology Age

Incredibles 2: Grace for the Technology Age

At 12-years-old, the release of Pixar’s original Incredibles hit me right between the eyes. Young enough for cartoons, yet old enough to understand some deeper implications of the story, I imagine I was at the center of their target audience. Certainly the question of Syndrome, the piece’s villain, was one I was beginning to ask myself as a budding teenager: if everyone is special, isn’t it true that no one is? How can I be uniquely valuable in a world where everyone is also uniquely valuable? It is a legitimate question, not just for children…

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The Triumph of Coco

The Triumph of Coco

Picture this: a young child, just beginning to develop his own taste, personality, and interests, takes up an art and begins to pursue it with all the intensity and excitement of youth. Along the way, however, he feels rejected and oppressed by his family, who vocally oppose his dreams of a grand future in which his art becomes his sole focus. “Wealth and fame might look alluring now,” they say, “but getting rich as an artist isn’t as easy as it looks, and the lifestyle holds far less actual happiness than you assume!” You know the rest, right?…

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Deconstructing A Wrinkle in Time

Deconstructing A Wrinkle in Time

“The resonant voice rose and the words seemed to be all around them so that Meg felt that she could almost reach out and touch them: ‘Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise from the end of the earth, ye who go down to the sea, and all that is therein; the isles, and the inhabitants thereof. Let the wilderness and the cities thereof lift their voice; let the inhabitants of the rock sing, let them shout from the top of the mountains. Let them give glory unto the Lord!’” So reads Madeleine L’Engle’s timeless classic, A Wrinkle in Time, a work of science fiction for juvenile readers... 

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Nightlights and Night Watches: The Unifying Experience of Literature

Nightlights and Night Watches: The Unifying Experience of Literature

Two in the morning just might be the loneliest time. The house lies still; only my thoughts run.  Lists of what I have done and what I must do alternately congratulate and accuse me, while instant replays of the previous day’s conversations play on my mind’s screen. Soon enough, I flee my bed for the solace of my living room chair. Here I sit in a pool of light with only Marilynne Robinson for company, and one could do worse to chase away night demons... 

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"The Penderwicks in Spring" and Expectation Games

"The Penderwicks in Spring" and Expectation Games

You guys. I just finished the latest Penderwicks book by Jeanne Birdsall. Do yourself a favor and grab a copy as soon as you can, because it was wonderful! Surrounded by tissues, red-nosed, and teary, I am remembering all of the reasons that this little family is my favorite. 

 

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On Donna Tartt's "The Goldfinch" – The Tale of a Modern "Idiot"

On Donna Tartt's "The Goldfinch" – The Tale of a Modern "Idiot"

I recently decided to augment my reading of the classics with some current fiction by reading a Pulitzer Prize winner at night before bed. I embarked on this venture with Donna Tartt’s 2014 winner, The Goldfinch.  The book’s reviews had me ready for a detective story extraordinaire, as did its illustrious awards and reviews. 

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Matters of Conscience – Reactions to Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman"

Matters of Conscience – Reactions to Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman"

I ordered Go Set a Watchman for myself back in February, as excited by the reported “discovery” of the pre-quel as the rest of the nation seemed to be.  To Kill a Mockingbird stands a beacon of American literature and a guardian of the virtuous American Southern identity which it helped to forge...

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