Flowers, Seeds, and Students

Flowers, Seeds, and Students

I can’t stop thinking about the passage in C. S. Lewis’s The Weight of Glory that I wrote about last time, where he cautions us against idolizing our memories of the past: “they are only the scent of a flower we have not found,” he says. I am sure he chose that image because of a flower’s beauty, but I wonder if he also had in mind how fleeting that beauty was designed to be...

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Teaching the Past with Woody Allen

Teaching the Past with Woody Allen

Woody Allen’s 2011 movie Midnight in Paris has it all: a star-studded cast, fantastic music, beautiful settings, and great camerawork. However, its greatest feature is the story itself. The protagonist is aspiring writer Gil Pender, who stumbles into a magic vortex that allows him to travel back to 1920s Paris, a place and time that he considers the high point of Western culture... 

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The In-Between

The In-Between

I’ve been reading a lot of children’s literature recently, due to my role as an Elementary Lit teacher here at CenterForLit. We just finished reading C. S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and I was struck by the youngest brother, Edmund’s, character development. Not a baby any longer to be coddled by his mother or sister, but not yet mature enough to claim a leader’s role like Peter, Edmund is half-baked, sullen, and in-process...

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Fair Trials and Kangaroo Courts: An Interpretive Philosophy

Fair Trials and Kangaroo Courts: An Interpretive Philosophy

I spent March on the road traveling to homeschool conventions. These are interesting events:  educators, professionals, and entrepreneurs of every stripe fill exhibit halls with their wares and spend literal hours on concrete floors explaining their materials. Wide-eyed parents are just trying to figure it all out so that their precious charges can get what they need to survive in the world... 

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A World Without Books and Other Catastrophes, or Why I Hate the Desert Island Game

A World Without Books and Other Catastrophes, or Why I Hate the Desert Island Game

Recently on our first BiblioFiles podcast, Ian posed the Desert Island Question:  If you were confined to a desert island with only three books, which would you choose? He and the rest of the CenterForLit staff laughed when I struggled to name three. I couldn’t decide. I was paralyzed. How could I possibly narrow it down to a mere three titles? 

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Christian Books and Christian Reading: Part Two

Christian Books and Christian Reading: Part Two

Ernest Hemingway’s prize winning 1953 novella The Old Man and the Sea opens on Santiago, an ancient fisherman, who is mired in an epic streak of bad luck. He has not caught a fish in many days – so many, in fact, that he is near starvation and has been shunned as cursed by the other fisherman in the small village where he lives and works. 

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Christian Books and Christian Reading

Christian Books and Christian Reading

If you have never read Jack London's 1908 story "To Build a Fire," you should put it on your winter reading list. This harrowing description of a man's struggle for survival in the sub-zero temperatures of the Yukon Territory will make this season's coldest day seem balmy by comparison. 

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