Macbeth: A Summer Seminar with Emily Andrews


Meet the Instructor: Emily Andrews graduated with degrees in English literature and History from Hillsdale College in 2014. Her Honors Thesis, "But remember–For that's my business to you:" Henry V and the Role of Wonder in Shakespeare's Historical Memory" was supervised by Dr. Stephen Smith, a well-respected scholar in the field of Shakespeare studies. Emily is in her third year of teaching with CenterForLit.

Meet the Instructor: Emily Andrews graduated with degrees in English literature and History from Hillsdale College in 2014. Her Honors Thesis, "But remember–For that's my business to you:" Henry V and the Role of Wonder in Shakespeare's Historical Memory" was supervised by Dr. Stephen Smith, a well-respected scholar in the field of Shakespeare studies. Emily is in her third year of teaching with CenterForLit.

The masterpieces of the Western canon are packed with meaningful, subtle details, intentionally placed there by authors to reward a careful reading of their text. The longer we immerse ourselves in a work of literature, the more enriched we will be by the significance of an author's word play, imagery, or style and structure. For this reason, we now offer a series of week-long seminars for students interested in diving deeper into their literary studies, led by CenterForLit staff members in their own areas of expertise. 

Emily has eagerly volunteered to lead the first of these seminars, and will begin with a summer study of William Shakespeare's Macbeth. Come learn why this supposedly cursed "Scottish Play" may in fact be one of the most poignant commentaries on redemption, while discovering the reason generations have considered Shakespeare the most brilliant word-smith of the English language. 

Course Objectives:

  • Find the thread of grace and redemption in the bleakest of tragedies. 
  • Meet William Shakespeare, and allow his use of language to help us see the study of literature with new eyes.
  • Use each day of class to focus on one act of the play.
  • Memorize Macbeth's famous "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow" monologue.

Course Details:

  • Time: classes meet between 2:00-3:30 p.m. EST (11:00-12:30 PST) from July 11-15.
  • Requirements: students are required to read the entirety of Macbeth before the first day of class, and re-read each act being discussed before attending that day's class. 
  • Technology: Like our Online Academy classes, we use the GoToWebinar conferencing service (included in tuition), which provides screen-sharing and live audio with chat.  Students raise hands to participate aloud, or chat privately with instructors.
  • Recordings: Class notes (.pdf) and .mp3 recordings are permanently available to all students. 
  • Features: Students have access to a class webpage with enrichment resources, as well as a discussion board, moderated by the Instructor. Students will there be able to continue class discussion after hours with their classmates. 
  • Tuition: $119 (Pelican Society: $107)